Metrics in Action

The images below shows how metrics are being used by markets across the U.S. Browse the gallery to get ideas for your market organization, and submit your own Metrics in Action.

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Charlottesville City Market

www.charlottesvillecitymarket.com

VIRGINIA -The Charlottesville Farmers Market needed a snapshot of a wide swath of activity in preparation for the city’s long term planning process to determine the market’s new location. The number of visitors highlighted the market’s ability to attract people to the downtown area. Justin McKenzie, Charlottesville Farmers Market Manager:

“The fact that we bring an average of 4,000-5,000 people to the area is astounding in a city with a population of just under 50,000.”

Visitor attendance was shared with and favorably received by the Director of Parks & Recreation, Economic Development, the City Manager’s office, and market vendors at their 2018 Annual Meeting.

Williamsburg Farmers Market

www.williamsburgfarmersmarket.com

VIRGINIA – Tracy Herner runs a #TuesdayTweets campaign at her Williamsburg Farmers Market in historic Williamsburg, Virginia. Each week she shares a metric with a thought-provoking question to make visitors really think about what the data is saying.

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Countryside Farmers Market

www.cvcountryside.org

OHIO –  Erin Molnar of Countryside Farmers Market continues the tradition started when the markets first opened to collect and share data with her vendors. She sends all vendors a weekly Market Statistics email, which includes change in sales, attendance, and weather information compared to the previous year. This kind of data helps vendors to gauge the market day and not just rely on anecdotal experience. This also helps vendors to understand how they’re doing in relation to other vendors at the market, and make adjustments as necessary.

Hampton Blvd. Farmers Market

 www.hamptonblvdfarmersmarket.com

VIRGINIA – The Hampton Blvd. Farmers Market is leading the way in using the one widget model of data use. At the outset of their inaugural market season in 2018, vendor profiles offered a very impressive average 21-mile distance from production site to market. By the height of the summer season with new vendors coming, the market was  able to show an even more impressive 11-mile average distance from production site to market! Not only does that stick in shoppers heads (to encourage those shoppers to see their vendors as neighbor/entrepreneurs), it lets prospective vendors know the market prioritizes nearby production and helps municipal and regional leaders understand why farmland preservation matters.

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MISSISSIPPI –  Sometimes a metric can show you the best way to use its data. The Mississippi  Farmers Market was so pleased with how this metric’s data told a story about their market and how easy it was to understand that they printed it exactly like this for the Department of Agriculture’s newsletter and made t-shirts with it for the market staff to wear. 

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Ruston Farmers Market

http://www.rustonfarmersmarket.org/

Louisiana –  Not all data has to be shared electronically! The Ruston market liked some of the individual data they gathered so much, they printed them as permanent sings in their market space.